Category: Board Games

Unstable Unicorns

Capsule Review: Unstable Unicorns

Darren backed this on Kickstarter and received his set shortly before Xmas.  We played a couple of games then and in January before he gave me a copy for my birthday last week.  I reckon now is as good a time as any for a capsule review.

Unstable Unicorns is a deck-building card game, reminiscent of Exploding Kittens, for 2-8 players where the goal is to form a stable of unicorns (exact number depends on the number of players.

There are three types of unicorn one plays with and several card types.  Each player on their turn can draw a card from the pool, play a card from their hand (or draw a second card from the pool rather than play) and discard down to a maximum hand size.  Most cards have particular actions affecting game play and it is possible to play specific cards out of turn in order to screw over players.  Once one player hits the stated goal, the game is over and that person wins.

There are three types of unicorns: babies, normal and magical.  Everyone starts with a baby unicorn, and it’s possible to get more through other cards.  Normal unicorns come in different styles but there are no other differences between them other than card design and name.  Magical unicorns have abilities that can affect the player each turn.  I should probably mention that as well as unicorns, Narwahls also feature and count as unicorns.  Again, just for a bit more flavour.

Other cards played can boost one’s stable, diminish another players stable, act as game changers or cancel the last card played.

It’s a very simple game to pick up as the game is more reactive rather than proactive.  Experienced players can anticipate particular cards and adjust their plans accordingly so novices may struggle against experts.  There’s a certain amount of king-making, much the same way as game like Munchkin and Settlers of Catan are played where the player in first place will be ganged up on.

In terms of aesthetics – the box is compact but tough, not flimsy cardboard.  The artwork on the card is cute, very Japanese in influence.  The text on the cards is a little small considering the size of the cards although I appreciate that “more text” can be a turn-off.  If you’re trying to read the cards in other player’s stables around the table, that can be hard.

There’s a bit of a learning curve in the game given all the different types of cards and effects.  There are also a few notable instances where rules lawyering is required.  However, a game be played in under thirty minutes, even with a larger group which can help.  The artwork will keep people amused and the game interrupts present genuine tactical choices.  Unstable isn’t quite top tier for quick card games like Dominion but it’s a worth addition to anyone’s collection.

I’ve also got the Uncut Unstable Unicorns Expansion pack full of more…adult cards, themes, graphics and the like. Good unwholesome fun.


Gaming Catch-Up

I keep trotting out this phrase – and its variants – but post move, I’m starting to rejoin my life.  And catch up with gaming, of course.  So this blog post will be a brief catch up on games, both video and board.

First on the list: the Doomsday Heist on GTA Online.  Essentially, James Bond is in the world of GTA online.  First of all, you need to buy a “facility”, an underground bunker not entirely unlike one used by a supervillain.  But relax, you’re not the supervillain.  Once you buy the facility, you’ll be contacted by Lester who has an opportunity for you…

I won’t ruin the story should you not have indulged, it’s a pretty good one, as these things go.  There are three parts to the heist and each part has a number of missions, both a set-up and the mission itself.  Set-ups typically involved undertaking an activity on a lobby map so other players can interrupt you and make your life miserable.  Missions are undertaken independently of the main lobby.  Anyone in your organisation or motorcycle gang (you need to be a CEO or Chapter Leader) can help in the set-ups and a minimum of two players are required to do the heists missions and finale.

Sales aside, the cost of purchasing a facility is several million dollars which is a significant in-game investment but the pay offs after each part of the overall heist are very much worth it.  But perhaps the key part of the Doomsday Heist update are the new vehicles available, including (and I’m not using the in-game names) the flying DeLorean with missiles (aka Flying Troll Car), Lotus Submersible, the Jet-Pack and others.  There’s also the Avenger – a mobile flying base like the big-rig introduced in part two of the Heist.  Lots of stuff for players to indulge in.

Each Facility can be pimped out, has storage for a number of cars and has a few optional extras.  These include strike teams to target other players, a receptionist to hand out free snacks & Pegasus Concierge services and perhaps the most interesting feature, the orbital cannon.  Instadeath on another player – it costs a lot to fire but can be satisfying to get back at trolls.  There’s also the usual deathmatches and other lesser vehicles in the update but most people don’t care about them.

Next on the list: Star Trek Timelines.  Version 4 of the game was released t’other week, the main updates were around rewards in the cryovault for immortalising specific groups of characters (races, traits etc) and more options for organising your crew, making it easier to compare, see who needs upgrading etc.  For those of us playing over two years, collecting the rewards for immortalising characters was amazingly rewarding.

Nothing new with Animation Throwdown except the addition of a new category of card: animal.  Been getting back into Wolfenstein 2: The New Colossus after a long hiatus.  Managed to get past the Roswell base and into the Uberkommando assassination missions.  Still refused to change from “normal” difficulty into easy although shouting at the Xbone is more the rule rather than the exception.

And in board games: I bought myself Ticket To Ride: France/Old West edition for my birthday as well as Eldritch Horror: Masks of Nyarlathoep expansion.  And P&D gave me a copy of Unstable Unicorns with the rude expansion pack. Haven’t tested any of them out though.  Gave away Scotland Yard to a work colleague and need to start putting my other games on eBay soon.  At KKOB’s yesterday, I played Power Grid for the first time and Small World with a number of expansion packs (except the Pirate one).

Exit: The Abandoned Cabin

So, a spoiler-free review of my latest board game (which went into the recycling as soon as we finished playing it)…

Exit: The Abandoned Cabin.  I bought this half on a whim, half because I wanted to try one of these escape room board games a few weeks ago.  Now that the nightmare of Xmas and New Year is over, schedules can return to normal and we arranged a game for last night.

E:TAC is one of six games in a series where players are required to solve a bunch of puzzles in order to escape from a room, in this case, an abandoned cabin where you just happen to have broken down outside of in the middle of the night.  Anyway, after passing out, you wake up to see you’re locked inside the cabin with nothing but a note and a decoder wheel taunting you to solve the puzzles and escape before whomever trapped you in the cabin returns.

The game is designed to be played between 1 & 6 players – we did it with 5.  There’s no strict order in which you have to solve the puzzles but there is something of a linear progression: one puzzle will unlock a second puzzle and bits and pieces for other puzzles.  There are also clue cards in case you get stuck which can give you hints or outright solutions if you’re really confused.  Puzzles test observation, wordplay, pattern analysis, number work – no special skills are really needed to crack these puzzles.  Some are straight forward logic, some are more cryptic.  There are no intuitive leaps to be made.  So as these games go, it’s a good entry-level game to the world of escape rooms.

Now, the main problem with this particular board game is you can only play it once.  You could try and play it twice but for three problems: 1) you need to destroy parts of the game.  2) there’s no new content.  3) The surprises would be ruined.  And because you need to destroy parts of the game (it is technically possible to work around but very difficult), you can’t pass it on or resell it.  However, at only £13, it’s no more expensive than a cinema ticket.  So yeah, once we finished it, the game ended up in the recycling (less what I wanted to keep for my scrapbook.

In terms of the physical specs: the box is A5 sized, the materials are clear and concise.  The artwork is alright – good enough for the puzzle solving although a bit cartoony and small.  And colours do play a significant role in the game so anyone who is colour-blind may have some difficulties.  Play the game in a well lit room.

So overall, a fun little game.  Challenging but rewarding and with enough twists and turns to keep it interesting and fresh.  Looking forward to the next one.



From where I sit, I’ve no idea when this blog was last updated but I’m sure it’s at least a month ago. My inability to be a good correspondent continues unabated – but don’t feel too left out folks, I’m neglecting others as well. I have a free hour in which to compose something for posterity so here we go.

Core Themes: Video Gaming, Board Gaming. In board gaming, my latest acquisitions are Sushi Go Party and a new one by Repos Games called Secrets, both of which were bought in the Swansea board game shop, The Gamers Emporium. Secrets is a hidden identity game, not unlike Avalon or Resistance but players score points and their identities can change in the course of the game. It provides a fresh take on the hidden identity game and is well worth checking out. I’ve also tracked down the 7 Wonders promo cards and a copy of the Catan Wonder for my collection which are on order.

In video gaming, there hasn’t been much outside my regular games. Star Trek Timelines have introduced the Starbase feature. When missions are completed, they drop components for upgrading Starbase rooms and you have to work together in fleets for perma-bonuses for your characters or to raise the Chroniton cap. Animation throwdown is about to have its one-year anniversary next week with gifts for players and our guild is doing pretty well at the moment. GTA Online launched the Smugglers Run update (basically huge planes that drop bombs) which I’m resisting for now – when there’s a “sale” on, then I’ll move into that feature, otherwise I’ll stick with the gun running type missions.

August wasn’t a bad month, for the most part. The weather turned ugly, much to the joy of a lot of people. After a really muggy, sweaty summer, having the temperatures hover around 21-22 degrees was a welcome respite. I had a little time off of work, kept things manageably quiet for the most part and finally got around to having a clear out of surplus and broken stuff. Two rubbish sacks of clothes got the chop, my small suitcase which had two old Sky decoders and my two broken 3DS XL consoles, one rubbish sack full of recycling (papers etc), one rubbish sack of just stuff destined for landfill/incinerator. My Xbox360 is going to go to CEX once I wipe the memory and I might take my old 3DS & DS games to be sold at the same time. That said – I haven’t decided if I’m definitely getting the Xbox One X when released in November.

Oh, we topped the Vauxhall Griffin Season 23 competiton ; god knows how. 

Stressful week – other people in hospital with serious stuff. No further details but hard times indeed.

Year of the…Blank


Although January was a fairly active month – in terms of social activity, there has not been much worth of pen and ink (or its 21st century equivalent). So that’s why the lack of blog posts. There’s been the usual gaming sessions, pub quizzes, work stuff (plus trips to Swansea and Bristol) and random activities that comprise of 21st century living. But other than going to Bristol (city centre rather than one of the suburbs), there has actually been nothing “new” to enjoy. Is that the theme for 2017? Take comfort in the familiar?

Something I did manage to do in both Bristol and Swansea was to visit the board game shops. I know, other folk in new places will make a beeline for the cultural sights, others the pubs, me – the board game shops. My lack of general life aside, I enjoyed my trip to both stores: The Gamers Emporium (High Street Swansea) and Excelsior Games (Bond Street Bristol). Both stores had play areas, bigger than those in Leisure Games but that’s not exactly difficult – no offence guys. And the stores were tastefully arranged showing the stock (sealed and opened). I felt compelled to make purchases in both of them (Eldritch Horror expansion Signs of Carcosa and Boss Monster 2 + some card sleeves) cos you have to support these businesses otherwise they’ll become something pointless like nail bars or tanning salons.

So looking ahead to February and beyond, there isn’t much more to note at present other than the usual run of birthdays and weekly activities. There’s the possibility of heading off to Dublin later in the month with work, might even be the day before my birthday. I’ve been trying to think of stuff to do either on the momentous day or that weekend but so far, I’ve drawn a complete blank. Well, that’s not true, there have been many ideas but all of them rejected for…well, pretty good reasons actually. If I don’t get something in diaries soon, it’ll be a re-run of last year’s couch fest. 

I think the vague plans I was formulating to head to Boston in late March are postponed – cash flow is an issue at the moment. The collapse in the pound has hit my finances too. I hadn’t noticed until January just how much more money I was haemorrhaging from my monthly stipend. I think these things are going to bear much closer scrutiny for the time being. It’s incredible how the newspapers aren’t screaming about this phenomenon but considering the political affinities of said papers, it’s not all that surprising. Put it this way, any dreams of home-ownership have receded even further away. Unless I can get a mortgage on a cardboard box around the back of Waterloo station.

Lastly, if you [happen to] read back through the reams and reams of material appended to this blog, you’ll see that I have a tendency to name years, sometimes after things that have happened to me, occasionally in response to other events. I’ve narrowed down 2016 to several possibilities before I settle on one: is the Year of Death – in response to the celebrity bloodbath? The Year of the Achilles – after my damn ankle issues for most of the year? The Year of the Sole Survivor – after enjoying Fallout 4 so much? The Year of Mitteleuropa – after my trips to Berlin, Austria and Slovakia? Or perhaps the Year of Stupid Decisions? I don’t think the latter requires any explanation. Comments on the back of a postcard please.


Picking up the January pace

Intended for publication on 12 January. 


The gentle beginning to 2017 continues unabated, eleven days into this new calendar. Only one person has complained of being broke but that’s because they cannot leave the sales alone rather than having overspent at Xmas or anything like that. Some of us can do restraint, it seems.
It was a pretty busy weekend at Casa Beaufoy. Friday night though was “lie prostrate on the couch”, particularly after the spicy chilli I cooked for myself. The week had by no means been busy – though exercise has been upped now leg is feeling better – but I felt drained and needed an evening of nothing/very little. Saturday morning, I pottered around the flat, finished off the chilli for lunch and then went out for much of the day. First stop was the board game shop in Finchley. Bought myself an expansion pack to Resistance (Hostile Intent), picked up one for Joey for Coup Resistance and 100 card protectors which will fit Talisman cards and Eldritch Horror cards. But if I were to protect all those games’ cards, I suspect well over 1500 will be needed. I don’t want to price that up…

Unlike most trips to Finchley, there was no time for coffee and pastries, it was on to the huge Paperchase on Tottenham Court Road for stickers (the mundane sort for identification mark purposes) and birthday cards. If like me and Adrian Mole, you find stationery buying vaguely erotic, then stay away because the sale will tempt you will all sorts of items. Exercise books, jotters, diaries, pens, pencils, weird and wonderful items…all designed to test the maxim “a fool and his money are soon parted”. Why Paperchase hasn’t supplanted WH Smiths as a good supplier I just don’t know as their merchandise is far superior. Distribution networks, I suppose. Why mention the stickers? Board games. My plan in the next month whilst things are still relatively quiet, is to begin to amalgamate/merge board games and their expansion packs together, particularly given the small space in the flat. If you remove the cardboard inlays, the boxes are far bigger than are needed but will hold more items. The problem is separating out multiple expansion items (characters, cards of various types, tokens etc). So different coloured stickers are my way around this. I don’t think _much_ space will be saved but it really needs to happen.

Back to the story-telling: post Paperchase, Orc’s Nest in Covent garden and the other board game shop where I felt suckered into buying the Eldritch Horror Expansion, Under the Pyramids. I just wanted to check to see if the price of Labryinth (the War on Terror Game, not the Ravensburger maze game) was cheaper. Somewhat poorer, I threw caution to the wind and had a late afternoon tea at Patisserie Valerie, chiefly killing time before going to Mr Butterley’s drink in the Welly. Vile place. I lasted an hour before my general antipathy drove me out of Soho. Certainly will not be trying that again without some fortifying Valium or similar. Way, way too busy, loud, obnoxious and full of nasty people. And no, not the people I was with, the general Soho-going masses.

Sunday was the board games day at the pub and it was utterly, utterly rammed. Tube strike didn’t deter _that_ many people. I was the principle target in Ca$h & Gun$ but my demonic leer made people drop out a lot (I don’t like using my powers for evil). Avalon – evil won three back to back games (idiot good types). One of the “children” in attendance had a mini-meltdown which served to put me in a ratty mood. Real childish stuff over losing games – if you can’t hack losing, don’t play.

This week, thus far, is your standard January week. We’re all doing our best to get through it even though there’s not much to get excited about. Routine hasn’t varied though last night we played a game of Shadows Over Camelot and the armies of good once again let Camelot fall to the armies of Mordred by siege engine victory. Did well on Spaceteam – level 12! 

Back hurts today. Was walking out the front door when I felt the stabbing pain of a trapped muscle/nerve. No painkillers yet…



Normal service can be resumed readers, the Xmas/New Year/Winterval (whatever) period is over and we’re now in the unofficial month of starvation where many resolve to stop eating unhealthily, drinking too much/at all, exercise greater financial restraint and typically have less fun. 


Mind you, I’ve been more austere in day-to-day living the last couple of weeks. In fact, I somehow ended up with more money at the end of December than I did at the end of November, despite having my week in Germany. What’s the secret? NO LIFE! Cutting right back on the alcohol, no pub quiz, no work (no work lunches in the canteen) and a steadfast refusal to engage in the usual end of year activities with family and friends. And when I listen to the stories of friends and colleagues about what they got up to and how bored they were by it all – unless they’re telling me what I want to hear – I have to ask “why do you put yourselves through it every year”?

Right, I’ll get off my moral high-ground now and launch into the few activities that did take place in the last couple of weeks. Steam’s Xmas sale was participated in, the Xbox sale was not. Nothing untoward and also ironic considering how little I’ve bothered with my PC this year. But I did see that several older games had made it to Steam, notably Star Wars Galactic Battlegrounds and Star Wars Rebellion (aka Supremacy for the UK owners of the game). So I snapped up those as well as the latest expansion for Age of Mythology HD (the Chinese expansion). Grand total – about £7. Galactic Battlegrounds does NOT like MacAfee however and any time I want to play the game, I have to go through a convoluted start up process. Basically, it confuses the intro video with a Trojan and autodeletes the file so the game won’t initialise.

I did find myself playing my PC a fair bit over the break as it happens. Not just the new games but also a couple Age of Empires 3 campaign games, a return to Beyond Earth and finally made some progress in Cubicle Quest once I figured out what the hell I was doing and how the game is played. Usual games on the Xbone, no new purchases to enjoy.

The Blue Oyster Cult would have us not fear the Reaper. They’re correct, you should fear the Werewolf instead. Yeah, in Berlin there was a bit of time to kill so I may have played more than a few games of Talisman on the iPad. Have to say that even though I’ve been a fiend for buying the various expansion packs, I’ve seldom made time to play, not least as a typical game – even on top speed – will take at least two hours to get through (with six players). But man cannot live by sightseeing, re-reading novels and Glüwein alone so I indulged in a few games. And I have to say that the Werewolf, introduced by the Blood Moon expansion pack, is perhaps one of the most challenging characters you face in the game. Why?

First of all, the Werewolf character moves around the board like the Reaper which doubles the chance of being landed on. But not only that, when the night card is in play (i.e. every other event card will trigger night), the Werewolf doesn’t need to land on a character. If his movement catches up to a player, they automatically encounter the Werewolf. The Werewolf doesn’t kill the player outright (like a roll of one on the Reaper chart) but he has three opportunities to rob players of life points and can turn other players into werewolves. Oh, and they add +1 to the dice on the Werewolf chart (allowing for greater chance of reward). What does this mean? At night, werewolves get +2 to combat rolls and must attack characters on the same space which sucks if the other player has better stats. And they can’t steal items except with spells or killing a player outright. But with more expansions in play, especially those adding to the board’s play area, it’s easier to dodge.

It’s the fact that the Werewolf can go flying around the board, aided by a number of adventure cards which interact with him unlike the Reaper who only moves after a player rolls a one for movement. But you can’t play with the expansion without the Werewolf because it’s a pain to separate all of those cards. Playing on the iPad, the AI is particularly vicious in sending the werewolf after any/all human players. So it’s harder to play the game successfully, as evidenced by my three losses which is a shameful blot on my win/loss record.

Outside of gaming, I watched the first and second seasons of Gotham – less “Batman, the teenage years” and more “what if everyone else took a level in badass in a world without a Batman?” Some episodes were very well put together and had lots of Easter eggs for the die-hard fans. Others struggled to advance the plot which did make you wonder if the series really needs 20+ parts per season. There is a fair amount of hammy acting: Jada Pinkett Smith’s smug snake (aka Fish Mooney) was getting more and more Eartha Kitt, especially towards the end of the second season. James Frain as Theo Galavan just reminded me of a young Lloyd Grossman sans the spectacles. I kept thinking he’d come out with “who lives in a house like this”? Even Ben McKenzie’s James Gordon isn’t immune to it when he’s in shouty mode. Whilst an entertaining watch, it makes you think what is this world’s Batman going to do when he comes of age? Many of his foes and villains are already established, unless we go back to the 1960s and resurrect characters like Egghead and King Tut.

C’est tout…pour maintenant.

Chilli, Pie & Ice-Cream


Wednesday night was our second play through of Star Wars Risk: Original Trilogy Edition. Paul was the Hutts, Matt K and I were the Empire and Brendan played both Rebel factions because I could not find a fifth person to join us for chilli, apple pie and ice-cream. Ingrates. Rebels won – I tried to be subtle in placing the Imperial base at a pinch point which the Rebels managed to take after tough battle. This is what comes of banking on a wing and a prayer, though I did succeed in duping everyone as to its actual placement (small consolation). They thought I was being C Rather than play a second game, we broke out 7 Wonders with all expansions except Babel. Paul won by two points, scores as always on BGG.

Turning to Thursday’s big news story, the decision of the High Court in determining that Article 50 may only be decided by a vote in Parliament rather than by the Royal Prerogative. Don’t want to be a political moaner but this story I felt, kinda needed a paragraph or two. I actually read the text of the decision and it was indeed spot on. In a nutshell, the decision states that triggering Article 50 will affect fundamental rights of people in the UK as well as causing the 1972 Communities Act to disapply. As these things are determined by Parliament rather than by the Head of State (i.e. Brenda), it is not appropriate to use the Royal Prerogative in this regard.

The press reaction was typically furious, at least from those elements who campaigned for a “No” result in the Referendum. Leaving aside the hypocrisy for a moment, it’s really been a damning moment exposing “yellow journalism” at its worst. One newspaper feels like its saying to its readers “here are three traitors, go out and liquidate them”, another is following on one MPs comments about the unelected judiciary (because elected judges work soooo well in the USA) and how that needs to be overhauled; usual rent-a-quote crap. And of course, there was a less-than-subtle jibe that the plaintiff in this case was born in Guyana (which used to be a British colony, lest we forget) and “foreigners are subverting our law”. The left wing papers aren’t gloating (obviously) but speculating on the likelihood of an early election. That’d be interesting to see as all parties were divided between Yes and Nos (I think the Yes’ outnumbered the Nos by 4 or 5-1). If an early election comes to pass, how would it affect MPs wishing to stand?

Buried away in the margins was a poll which said that if the referendum were to be repeated tomorrow, the “Yes” camp would win. All in all, I’m reminded of that ancient Chinese curse: may you live in interesting times.

Not much happening over the weekend. Thinking of a wander over to Borough Market, maybe Games Quest or Orc’s Nest – y’know, the usual fleshpots. This week’s music spree has continued, several more tunes bought. For me, this is a very unusual occurrence given a lot of my music tends to come from Kwed and Overclocked & Amiga Remix. No one-fixed genre or anything, just celebrating November. Or something.

As you can tell, this blog post was intended for Friday. I’m terrible.  

Last night we broke out Star Wars Risk for a game between myself, Paul Palpatine and Brendan the Hutt. It’s the version released last year which the East London mafia and myself played but I cannot recall if I logged or not. So here’s the game again: 

Right – it’s set around the original trilogy but pre A New Hope as Alderaan is yet to be an asteroid field. There are two ways of playing the game; the regular way and the campaign mode. Regular mode only supports five players (I guess six player games are too frustratingly tight so they dropped a mode). And in the campaign, there are three factions, Rebel Alliance, Empire, Hutts and all three have different missions: Rebels need to capture/kill Palpatine, Empire need to wipe out the Rebels and the Hutts need to capture ten of the thirteen resource planets on the map. If played with 3/5 players then one or two respectively will control the factions whilst the Hutts are a third team. In a 2/4 player game, the Hutts are neutral.

So a little more about the campaign. Players need to work together and work against each other in order to further their goals. Both the Rebels and the Hutts start at a numerical disadvantage in terms of starting systems and troops so need to chip away at the Empire. But the Empire and the Rebels want to ensure that the Hutts don’t claim too many resource planets. And the Empire and the Hutts might find themselves disadvantaged by the Rebel’s special cards. Also in the game is the “Force Meter”. As the campaign progresses, the Force will favour the light or the dark side which will affect how many cards Rebel and Empire players can draw (Hutts are immune to this). This also affects the ability when attacking the Death Star.

Yes, I said Death Star. Everyone’s favourite grey orb makes an appearance in the game. Its principle use is to act as a deterrent; the system where the Death Star is placed cannot be attacked and that doesn’t even have to be a system owned/occupied by the Empire. And of course with the right card, the Death Star can obliterate a system, making it totally impassable and impossibly to occupy. Both the Rebels and the Hutts can destroy the Death Star but it’s quite difficult as they need a roll of 18 (typically) with 3 D8s. Depending on the balance of the Force, this could be reduced to 15 or increased to 21.

Also in the mix are ships: at the start of each turn, one reinforcement may be exchanged for a support ship. There are fighters, bombers and Capital ships, three of each (so a maximum of nine can be floating about the game. Up to three can be used by each side in battle (depending on whether the player is attacking or defending): each fighter means that one dice cannot be a 1, each bomber adds one to the highest dice (then the second highest dice, then the third) whilst each Capital Ships allow the player to swap D6s for D8s. Ships can be reinforced separate to ground troops which allow more versatility in the game.

What’s this about capturing Palpatine? Empire player(s) have up to six Imperial bases they must play at the start of their turn(s). Five of the bases are manned by decoys, the six is manned by Palpatine. When attacked, the Empire player will always use D8s to defend. So if all troops protecting the base are wiped out, the base falls. Rebels “keep” the base, Hutts can choose to show the base to the Rebel player(s) but the tokens are returned to the Empire pool for redeployment. Destroyed bases by the Rebels affect movement of the Force Meter.

And finally, the principle amendment for the campaign are the cards. There are three decks, one for the Imperials, one for the Rebels and one for the Hutts. When planets are conquered in the normal way, cards are drawn (with possible bonuses depending on the Force Meter, or the number of Resource Planets owned in the case of the Hutts). Cards can be traded in for sets as per usual or the ability described on the card which might be “add one to all dice after a roll” or “when attacked, roll a dice and add that many extra troops to the planet where you are being invaded”. All interesting stuff and prevents the game from being stale.

The map broadly corresponds to the classical Risk Map although the connecting lines between planets and sectors are balanced a little differently. Both “Australia” and “South America” have two links to other continents (rather than the single line for Australia). But Risk veterans will feel more or less at home in the game even though there are weird and wonderful planets and sector names. The pieces are typical of the newer Risk pieces: units representing one troop and three troops (which are needed as the map feels a little small and can get very crowded.

As you can tell from the first paragraph, Paul was the Empire, Brendan was the Hutts whilst I was the Rebel Alliance. I [would have] won but we ran out of time. I managed to clean the Hutts from the board and was poised to go all out on the Empire. I got lucky breaking the back of the Empire in one attack thanks to cards which allowed me to add 1 to all dice and simultaneously have 2 D8s when I was faced with a tonne of Imperial reinforcements challenging occupation of a sector. The Empire never recovered from this loss, I had unquestioned control of “South America”, “Australia” and “Africa” so kept stockpiling the reinforcements until armies could be unleashed in a massive blitzkrieg.

Dinner was a combo of leftovers from the Raclette session together with some Bulgar wheat and a spare Tortilla that was doing nothing in the Freezer. Was kinda going for a “Southern Breakfast” feel with the Bulgar Wheat subbing in for Grits. Kinda. I know calling something else grits is a blasphemy but allow me a little creative licence. Following dinner, there were Belgian waffles & ice cream for after. That’s good eating.

Beige Skies?

A dull-looking October Wednesday where there is zero sky, just cloud. A bunch of really dull autumnal fashions on display (this season is beige, apparently) as well as pavements covered in leaves. At least in Lambeth – Westminster is a little more organised though most of the brown and gold little buggers are remaining steadfastly stuck to their progenitors. 

How was your weekend? Mine blessedly began on Thursday this week as I felt the need to take an extra day off. Given the activities and tasks required for Saturday and Sunday, having more time to deal with shopping, cleaning, cooking and stress reduction. Played a bit of Fallout, progressing my latest game. Although I hadn’t noticed that the final three expansion packs had failed to install, instead were awaiting manual intervention. So once I did that, began to update my settlements with the latest items, current favourite being the Nuka Cola mixer which makes all those crappy bottles suddenly worth their weight in caps.

Disappointment of board games Wednesday – played a game of King of Tokyo and NOBODY DIED! How can you play a game when nobody is clawing anyone else to death in an attempt to take control of the Japanese capital. Such a passive game – ugh. I was the only one really trying to do damage to other players. Damn wussy types. I’m not going to let the others forget that either. We also had a game of (American) Ticket to Ride, Paul won – I would have had I ended the game earlier but I was trying to farm tickets and not having a great deal of luck getting good routes to score the most points. In the three turns Paul snuck in with a cheap victory, he played two-fifteen points which enabled him to win the game by eight points. You can see my folly; hubris being the precursor to nemesis.

And we were also playing a game of Spaceteam which is a mobile game which Marcin introduced me to. Although the damn game is unstable with four players (at least on my home router), we did ultimately manage to get several sessions in. If you don’t know it, it’s a co-op game for between 2-8 players where the premise is that we are on a spaceship trying to outrun what looks like a supernova and in the fine tradition of Star Trek technobabble, have to work together to control the space ship out of danger. Buttons, switchers, levers and sliders need to be pushed but the instructions will pop up not only on your phone but on those of other people. So the game quickly dissolves into a shouty, brawling mess as people holler commands and those who cannot differentiate between two sets of verbal instructions flounder. Great fun.

Just to mention a thank-you to Star Trek Timelines for not hosting an event last weekend by listening to feedback from us fans. They’ve been event heavy recently with something going on every weekend for the past couple of months. Some of the events are really time intensive and for a light-touch game, is something you just don’t want to keep committing to.

So Friday, met a friend for lunch (tapas), went shopping for Raclette cheese and other odds and sods, cleaned the house, more F4. I heartily recommend Selfridge’s Ratatouille chutney. I had a grim feeling that it was going to be another of my bad-choice impulse purchases but actually it was really, really good. Especially on the Raclette. Oxford Street wasn’t too bad in terms of crowds. Only one surge of anger walking down Regent’s Street towards the bus stop. Usual issue – family of five all walking side by side on a narrow pavement at pall-bearer pace.

Saturday was Raclette day – went very well though was totally drained by the end of it. And most of Sunday was quiet, some low-level activities until time for the Steak House quiz prize. I enjoyed the soup, the fishcake and the Tiramisu for dessert. Food was good, liquor was excellent and the restaurant ambience was better than the first time – no squabbling middle aged couples. Two of the table had a strop and refused to pay the full share of the tip (one of the “free” bowls of fries worth £3.75 was delivered late which meant a £15 shortfall). So I made that up myself. I declined to join the others in a pub afterwards; not because of the strop but my ankle was on fire (really need to see a doctor) and I went home to lie on my bed for three hours. Then I shuffled under the duvet.

Final thought for the day. I never saw the appeal of the band/group Yes. I don’t hate them, I don’t have anything against them but their appeal is something that I struggle with. Still, Rick Wakeman was always good on the various TV shows that he appeared on in the 80s and 90s. Why I chose to say/type that, I just don’t know. Call it brain-fart of the day, number one. Not a bad start to a Wednesday.